Project Description

'Site, Substance and Sensation', 2016. Switchback Gallery, Federation University, Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel

‘Site, Substance and Sensation’, 2016. Switchback Gallery, Federation University, Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy fo John Ansel

'Site, Substance and Sensation', 2016. Switchback Gallery, Federation University, Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel.jpg

‘Site, Substance and Sensation’, 2016. Switchback Gallery, Federation University, Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel.

Site, Substance and Sensation, 2016. Switchback Gallery, Churchill.

Site, Substance and Sensation, 2016 developed from my response to the surrounding external pine forest. The sensorial installation comprised of multiple pine tree logs, positioned vertically throughout Switchback Gallery. To deaden the echo in the gallery and enhance the scent of pine, a layer of pine bark covered the floor. The pine plantation frames Switchback Gallery. Switchback Gallery frames the immersive installation of vertical pine tree logs and the Sensory Project Site (a specially constructed studio in the pine forest) is framed by the pine tree plantation. Between the intersecting paths of installations at Switchback Gallery and the Sensory Project Site, visitors were presented with a here and now experience. Entwining transformative potential of materiality in artwork is a response to an impermanent world in flux, where we continually readjust this metaphoric encounter between our conditions of complacency with ongoing progression.

 

Through their dislocation, each tree becomes more telephone pole than pine tree and yet in the way they are installed, marching through the gallery, they remain evocative of the plantation that once was. WhileSite, Substance and Sensation does not intend to be political, an ecological awareness is embedded in my investigations. Resituating a pine plantation into the site of the gallery context implicitly challenges the neutrality of space, between internal and external, past and present, and the accompanying presumption of a universal visitor.