Project Description

Site, Substance and Sensation’ 2016. Sensory Project Site, Federation University, Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel.

6. 'Site, Substance and Sensation' 2016. Sensory Project Site. Federation University Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel

‘Site, Substance and Sensation’ 2016. Sensory Project Site. Federation University Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel

7. 'Site, Substance and Sensation', 2016. Sensory Project Site, Federation University Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel

‘Site, Substance and Sensation’, 2016. Sensory Project Site, Federation University Gippsland Campus. Photograph courtesy of John Ansel

Site, Substance and Sensation, 2016. The Sensory Project Site.

After months of examining various possible uses of the walnut tree, it became increasingly evident it was essential for my research project to be tested in a particular studio environment. My projects developed from explorations of the immediate environment. If I hadn’t built the Sensory Project Site, the other projects would not have come to fruition. In my purpose-built studio, I could fully investigate limitations, appreciations and identify how meaning can be found in contemporary art, between site specific, materiality and sensory experiences.

The Sensory Project Site is framed by the pine tree plantation and the pine plantation is surrounded by native endemic Plains Woodlands. Juxtaposing the heaviness of the vertical pine log installation inside Switchback Gallery, a lighter airy space was offered to visitors inside the Sensory Project Site. Multiple layers of muslin cloth infused with the smoke from the Narrow-leaf Peppermint gum was installed in this space. The walls and ceiling were covered with Peppermint gum leaves. Camouflaging the external surface of the Sensory Project Site with pine needles was an experiment to stimulate ongoing progression to the exterior perimeters of site.

Interesting tensions arose between the material aesthetics of Peppermint gum foliage cladding the interior and the peripheral textures of the pine plantation. The internal space of the Sensory Project Site has a quiet and calm ambience combined with the evocative materials of gum tree foliage. In comparison, the external environment consisting of rows of pine trees, rough bark, knobbly pine cones and twigs scattered over a dense layer of pine needles covering the ground.

 

Interconnection between the transformative qualities of material are reflected with our biological self. Perception of transformative materials can be defined as experiencing the flow of time. I consider transient conditions, ways in which the site is conditioned or determined, and the passage of life itself as integral to my creative process.